October142014
ftnd-blog:

The Good Guys: When Major Corporations Say No To Profiting Off Porn
As a $97 billion a year global industry, porn has become a viable revenue stream for otherwise legitimate corporations. Gas stations and gift shops sell porn magazines, hotels offer porn films as part of their in-room entertainment services, clothing/apparel companies continue to push the boundaries of pornographic advertising, cable and internet service providers offer a wide array of options to cater to the pornography viewing experience, and the list goes on and on. 
With too many major corporations secretly (and not-so-secretly) profiting off the porn industry, we figured we would shout out a few of the good guys - the major worldwide corporations that have publicly rejected pornography and chosen to make their millions of dollars without making porn a part of their bottom line, as easy as it would be for them to do so. 
So here are five awesome companies that have kicked porn to the curb in the last decade, choosing not to be responsible for the proliferation of this new drug in society.
1. Google

Just a few months ago, in July of this year, Google released a statement to their advertisers, informing them of Google’s new policy to no longer accept AdWords advertisements containing explicit language or that link to porn sites. For the average Googler, users will no longer see any sidebar search results or ads for porn sites.
While this was a move that will significantly affect Google’s reported $100 million a day AdWords revenue, they made the decision anyway to walk away from making money off of porn. 
Mad props, Google.

2. Sony Corp.

In early 2007, Sony Corp. announced that it would not work with the adult film industry to put porn movies on Sony’s popular Blu-ray Disc format.
The company disallowed its disc-replicating outlet, Sony DADC Global, to handle adult film titles. Sony or any of it’s subsidiaries won’t duplicate any movies that are above a certain rating or that have not been certified by a local motion picture association.
Basically, Sony told pornographers that they would have to find somewhere else to produce their content. Sony cut the porn industry out of their Blu-ray camp and told their Blu-ray replicators that if they produced adult content, they would lose their license.
So despite facing the threat of being surpassed by competitors in the high definition disc market that were willing to take the business of the porn industry, Sony said no to profiting off of porn. 
You rock, Sony.
3. Marriott International

In 2011, Marriott International, one of the largest hotel chains in the world, released a statement saying it would no longer offer in-room adult films. Marriott’s statement said it would “phase out porn over the next few years … across our system,” and that, “it is our practice to keep adult content out of the reach of children and unavailable to any adult who chooses not to view it.”
The change has affected nearly 600,000 rooms in the Marriott-brand hotels, which include Fairfield Inn and Suites by Marriott, Renaissance Hotels, Courtyard by Marriott, as well as Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company LLC and others.
While in-room porn films have been known to be a solid stream of revenue for hotel chains, Marriott wasn’t cool with being one of them.
Good for you, Marriott.

4. Apple

Here is just one of the million reasons that Apple is awesome. The innovative company is actually very well known to be against porn. Legendary Apple founder Steve Jobs said in an email exchange with a customer in 2011, that he believed he had a “moral responsibility” to reject pornographic content on Apple products.
He famously wrote, “Folks who want porn can buy [an] Android.”
Jobs also defended his stance against a critique from a magazine writer who objected to an Apple commercial calling the iPad a revolution, while banning porn in the App Store. ”Revolutions are about freedom,” the journalist wrote.
Jobs responded that Apple products offer users freedom from porn, and told the writer that he might care more about porn when he had children.
Apple’s App Store guidelines are very clear about pornography:
Apps containing pornographic material, defined by Webster’s Dictionary as “explicit descriptions or displays of sexual organs or activities intended to stimulate erotic rather than aesthetic or emotional feelings”, will be rejected.
Apps that contain user generated content that is frequently pornographic (ex. “Chat Roulette” Apps) will be rejected.
Apple seemed to feel that with all of its impressive technological achievements to be remembered, it didn’t want “making it easier to view porn” to be one of them.
Can Apple get any cooler?

5. Omni Hotels & Resorts

Omni Hotels & Resorts is a luxury hotel chain that offers over 20,000 rooms all over the United States, Canada, and Mexico. In 1999, Omni was credited as the first national hotel chain to remove porn from their services.
"This was never a business decision," said Omni spokesperson Caryn Kboudi. "Our ownership at the time had younger children, and it just wasn’t a way as an organization that we felt we wanted to make money."
You’re awesome, Omni. Enough said. 
—————————
We respect cool companies that decide to ignore the dollar signs they could be making, in favor of not promoting and increasing the demand for something as harmful as pornography.
If you are with us, share this article and let people know who the good guys are. 
#fightthenewdrug

ftnd-blog:

The Good Guys: When Major Corporations Say No To Profiting Off Porn

As a $97 billion a year global industry, porn has become a viable revenue stream for otherwise legitimate corporations. Gas stations and gift shops sell porn magazines, hotels offer porn films as part of their in-room entertainment services, clothing/apparel companies continue to push the boundaries of pornographic advertising, cable and internet service providers offer a wide array of options to cater to the pornography viewing experience, and the list goes on and on. 

With too many major corporations secretly (and not-so-secretly) profiting off the porn industry, we figured we would shout out a few of the good guys - the major worldwide corporations that have publicly rejected pornography and chosen to make their millions of dollars without making porn a part of their bottom line, as easy as it would be for them to do so. 

So here are five awesome companies that have kicked porn to the curb in the last decade, choosing not to be responsible for the proliferation of this new drug in society.

1. Google

image

Just a few months ago, in July of this year, Google released a statement to their advertisers, informing them of Google’s new policy to no longer accept AdWords advertisements containing explicit language or that link to porn sites. For the average Googler, users will no longer see any sidebar search results or ads for porn sites.

While this was a move that will significantly affect Google’s reported $100 million a day AdWords revenue, they made the decision anyway to walk away from making money off of porn. 

Mad props, Google.

2. Sony Corp.

image

In early 2007, Sony Corp. announced that it would not work with the adult film industry to put porn movies on Sony’s popular Blu-ray Disc format.

The company disallowed its disc-replicating outlet, Sony DADC Global, to handle adult film titles. Sony or any of it’s subsidiaries won’t duplicate any movies that are above a certain rating or that have not been certified by a local motion picture association.

Basically, Sony told pornographers that they would have to find somewhere else to produce their content. Sony cut the porn industry out of their Blu-ray camp and told their Blu-ray replicators that if they produced adult content, they would lose their license.

So despite facing the threat of being surpassed by competitors in the high definition disc market that were willing to take the business of the porn industry, Sony said no to profiting off of porn. 

You rock, Sony.

3. Marriott International

image

In 2011, Marriott International, one of the largest hotel chains in the world, released a statement saying it would no longer offer in-room adult films. Marriott’s statement said it would “phase out porn over the next few years … across our system,” and that, “it is our practice to keep adult content out of the reach of children and unavailable to any adult who chooses not to view it.”

The change has affected nearly 600,000 rooms in the Marriott-brand hotels, which include Fairfield Inn and Suites by Marriott, Renaissance Hotels, Courtyard by Marriott, as well as Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company LLC and others.

While in-room porn films have been known to be a solid stream of revenue for hotel chains, Marriott wasn’t cool with being one of them.

Good for you, Marriott.

4. Apple

image

Here is just one of the million reasons that Apple is awesome. The innovative company is actually very well known to be against porn. Legendary Apple founder Steve Jobs said in an email exchange with a customer in 2011, that he believed he had a “moral responsibility” to reject pornographic content on Apple products.

He famously wrote, “Folks who want porn can buy [an] Android.”

Jobs also defended his stance against a critique from a magazine writer who objected to an Apple commercial calling the iPad a revolution, while banning porn in the App Store. ”Revolutions are about freedom,” the journalist wrote.

Jobs responded that Apple products offer users freedom from porn, and told the writer that he might care more about porn when he had children.

Apple’s App Store guidelines are very clear about pornography:

Apps containing pornographic material, defined by Webster’s Dictionary as “explicit descriptions or displays of sexual organs or activities intended to stimulate erotic rather than aesthetic or emotional feelings”, will be rejected.

Apps that contain user generated content that is frequently pornographic (ex. “Chat Roulette” Apps) will be rejected.

Apple seemed to feel that with all of its impressive technological achievements to be remembered, it didn’t want “making it easier to view porn” to be one of them.

Can Apple get any cooler?

5. Omni Hotels & Resorts

image

Omni Hotels & Resorts is a luxury hotel chain that offers over 20,000 rooms all over the United States, Canada, and Mexico. In 1999, Omni was credited as the first national hotel chain to remove porn from their services.

"This was never a business decision," said Omni spokesperson Caryn Kboudi. "Our ownership at the time had younger children, and it just wasn’t a way as an organization that we felt we wanted to make money."

You’re awesome, Omni. Enough said. 

—————————

We respect cool companies that decide to ignore the dollar signs they could be making, in favor of not promoting and increasing the demand for something as harmful as pornography.

If you are with us, share this article and let people know who the good guys are. 

#fightthenewdrug

October122014
catholic-daily:

"If I were not a Catholic, and were looking for the true Church in the world today, I would look for the one Church which did not get along well with the world; in other words, I would look for the Church which the world hated. My reason for doing this would be, that if Christ is in any one of the churches of the world today, He must still be hated as He was when He was on earth in the flesh. If you would find Christ today, then find the Church that does not get along with the world. Look for the Church that is hated by the world as Christ was hated by the world. Look for the Church that is accused of being behind the times, as our Lord was accused of being ignorant and never having learned. Look for the Church which men sneer at as socially inferior, as they sneered at Our Lord because He came from Nazareth. Look for the Church which is accused of having a devil, as Our Lord was accused of being possessed by Beelzebub, the Prince of Devils. Look for the Church which, in seasons of bigotry, men say must be destroyed in the name of God as men crucified Christ and thought they had done a service to God. Look for the Church which the world rejects because it claims it is infallible, as Pilate rejected Christ because He called Himself the Truth. Look for the Church which is rejected by the world as Our Lord was rejected by men. Look for the Church which amid the confusions of conflicting opinions, its members love as they love Christ, and respect its Voice as the very voice of its Founder, and the suspicion will grow, that if the Church is unpopular with the spirit of the world, then it is unworldly, and if it is unworldly it is other worldly. since it is other-worldly, it is infinitely loved and infinitely hated as was Christ Himself. But only that which is Divine can be infinitely hated and infinitely loved. Therefore the Church is Divine."
Venerable Archbishop Fulton Sheen

catholic-daily:

"If I were not a Catholic, and were looking for the true Church in the world today, I would look for the one Church which did not get along well with the world; in other words, I would look for the Church which the world hated. My reason for doing this would be, that if Christ is in any one of the churches of the world today, He must still be hated as He was when He was on earth in the flesh. If you would find Christ today, then find the Church that does not get along with the world. Look for the Church that is hated by the world as Christ was hated by the world. Look for the Church that is accused of being behind the times, as our Lord was accused of being ignorant and never having learned. Look for the Church which men sneer at as socially inferior, as they sneered at Our Lord because He came from Nazareth. Look for the Church which is accused of having a devil, as Our Lord was accused of being possessed by Beelzebub, the Prince of Devils. Look for the Church which, in seasons of bigotry, men say must be destroyed in the name of God as men crucified Christ and thought they had done a service to God. Look for the Church which the world rejects because it claims it is infallible, as Pilate rejected Christ because He called Himself the Truth. Look for the Church which is rejected by the world as Our Lord was rejected by men. Look for the Church which amid the confusions of conflicting opinions, its members love as they love Christ, and respect its Voice as the very voice of its Founder, and the suspicion will grow, that if the Church is unpopular with the spirit of the world, then it is unworldly, and if it is unworldly it is other worldly. since it is other-worldly, it is infinitely loved and infinitely hated as was Christ Himself. But only that which is Divine can be infinitely hated and infinitely loved. Therefore the Church is Divine."

Venerable Archbishop Fulton Sheen

(via by-grace-of-god)

10PM
“You are so brave and quiet I forget you are suffering.” Ernest Hemingway, A Farewell to Arms (via writeloneliness)

(Source: larmoyante, via laborare-est-orare)

10PM

failmacaw:

THE NINE CHOIRS OF HEAVEN.  An info-graphic for my editorial class and god am I thankful it’s done.  Way too much went into this than what I had time for, but hey… I actually kind of like it?

Now excuse me, I must return to my fashion major lifestyle and go sew a coat u_u

EDIT:  Re-uploaded with easier viewing! 

2PM
Rediscover Catholicism

Rediscover Catholicism

October82014
St. John Paul II, Love and Responsibility

St. John Paul II, Love and Responsibility

October12014
St. John Paul II, Love and Responsibility

St. John Paul II, Love and Responsibility

September302014
September272014
Hang in there Joan  (at St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church)

Hang in there Joan (at St. Joan of Arc Catholic Church)

September232014
ftnd-blog:

A Personal Message To Fight the New Drug
As you can probably imagine, Fight the New Drug gets thousands of messages and emails from people all over the world, sharing their stories about how pornography has affected their lives. 
Some of them are heartbreaking stories of damaged lives and relationships. 
Some of them are positive stories of how an addiction was overcome. 
Some of them are just simple shows of support to the movement. 
Recently, we received a pretty heartbreaking story, sent to us by a twenty-something girl. Her story is one of a childhood scarred by her father’s porn use and a developing sense of confusion about sex and intimacy that porn creates.
We wish we could tell you that this a rare story from the occasional inbox message we receive. It’s not. This is one of the thousands of emails we get and the vast majority of them are just. like. this. one.
———————————————
Fight the New Drug,
I would really appreciate if you could publish this anonymously. It’s my story. Thank you for everything you do.
I barely knew how to speak when I was first exposed to this human filth. My parents divorced when I was four and after that I would spend most weekends and some holidays with my father. I loved and adored him, and we would sleep in the same bed most of the time. Most nights, when he thought I was asleep, he would watch porn on TV. Hardcore porn. To this day, I remember with graphic detail what he was watching. Everything was dark. I didn’t know what it was but I was so shocked and scared. I didn’t let him know I was awake, because even then I could understand that I wasn’t supposed to be watching that. I used to roll around and pretend I had been woken up, but still he never once turned off the TV. He would just say, “Don’t bother, it’s nothing, go to sleep.” 
What I saw on the television was the first perception I had of sex. I now know that his addiction blurred any normal perceptions one might have. It made my father totally blind to my pain and to the ones around him. 
I grew up feeling guilty and dirty. Sometimes I would say shocking things to other girls, just to see how they reacted. I felt that I was dirty and they were innocent. Sometimes I would draw naked women and then smudge everything out so that nobody would know.
As an adolescent, I dreaded the way my body was changing, the way it was growing to resemble the bodies of the women my father loved and failed to hide from me. I couldn’t see how he didn’t ever think that these girls were like me: somebody’s daughters. Did he want me, his daughter, to behave like that? Did he have no empathy for women at all? 
As I grew up, I began to fight and yell at him that only perverts do what he does. Then my grandmother would tell me, “That’s what real men do! He is not a homosexual that’s why!” There was nowhere to go. I didn’t want to tell my mother anything because I didn’t want to upset her. In my head I felt like I was protecting her, I felt I had to be strong enough for everybody. 
When I visited my father, I would dress as childish and covered as I could. I just didn’t feel safe with him. It hurt more than I can express with words, the thought that this was the man that was supposed to protect me from perverts, from predators, and from the world; yet instead I felt I needed to hide myself and protect myself from him. We used to walk on the beach and he would take his camera out and take pictures of sunbathing women before they could notice him. No amount of porn or real women was ever enough for him. Thus I grew up feeling that a “real man” was somebody unable to control any urge.
I also grew up feeling that any woman was more important to my father than me; all she had to do was show her body and I would just disappear from his conscience. He would instantly go from being present and caring to treating me like a nuisance to be disposed of. Growing up I never had any notion of romance, marriage, or the possibility of happy monogamy. I thought all these things were a huge lie and thought I knew the truth: sex was everything and love was just a nonexistent idea between a man and a woman.
I had my first boyfriend at age 17 and we went much further than I wanted. I hated it and felt dirty for days. Why did I do it? Because we were in the same social group and I was afraid that he would embarrass me by telling everybody that I was a virgin, like being a virgin was such a bad and shameful thing. That’s how skewed my version of sex and intimacy was. And who could I tell? Everybody thought that porn was sexy, that it was cool, or a good subject for joking. I saw that other men admired my father for being so “sexual” and for being able to get so many women. The society that we lived in told him that he was “a real man”, and told me that I must be too sensitive.
Then, lucky for me, I started associating with women who fought; who courageously expressed what they really thought and felt, no matter how unpopular it made them. I confronted my father and said all I wanted was to hear an acknowledgement, a simple apology for what he had put me through. He denied everything. 
The last time I was in his house I discovered porn and I erased everything. All he had to say about it was that he was angry because “I trespassed his private files.” He finished by telling me, “Why is it your concern what I like or not?”
He is a lonely man now. He calls me often to try and get me to talk to him. I miss having a father. We traveled together so many times growing up and I played with him often as a child. But I cannot forget. Everybody has to live with their own choices. And he does. I now haven’t seen him for over a year.
So few people know about my struggles. If I had grown up with an alcoholic father, oh how easy it would have been to speak about it. Everybody knows what that is and everybody can be sympathetic. But this? You have to hide and feel shameful. You feel that people don’t understand. How can you explain it?
——————————————————-
Isn’t this a heartbreaking story? 
Unfortunately, this is what porn does. It can create an obsession with something that is not real and lead people to isolate themselves or loved ones. 
Share this story to show support for the brave Fighter that shared her story with us to help raise awareness on the harmful effects of pornography.

ftnd-blog:

A Personal Message To Fight the New Drug

As you can probably imagine, Fight the New Drug gets thousands of messages and emails from people all over the world, sharing their stories about how pornography has affected their lives.

Some of them are heartbreaking stories of damaged lives and relationships.

Some of them are positive stories of how an addiction was overcome.

Some of them are just simple shows of support to the movement.

Recently, we received a pretty heartbreaking story, sent to us by a twenty-something girl. Her story is one of a childhood scarred by her father’s porn use and a developing sense of confusion about sex and intimacy that porn creates.

We wish we could tell you that this a rare story from the occasional inbox message we receive. It’s not. This is one of the thousands of emails we get and the vast majority of them are just. like. this. one.

———————————————

Fight the New Drug,

I would really appreciate if you could publish this anonymously. It’s my story. Thank you for everything you do.

I barely knew how to speak when I was first exposed to this human filth. My parents divorced when I was four and after that I would spend most weekends and some holidays with my father. I loved and adored him, and we would sleep in the same bed most of the time. Most nights, when he thought I was asleep, he would watch porn on TV. Hardcore porn. To this day, I remember with graphic detail what he was watching. Everything was dark. I didn’t know what it was but I was so shocked and scared. I didn’t let him know I was awake, because even then I could understand that I wasn’t supposed to be watching that. I used to roll around and pretend I had been woken up, but still he never once turned off the TV. He would just say, “Don’t bother, it’s nothing, go to sleep.”

What I saw on the television was the first perception I had of sex. I now know that his addiction blurred any normal perceptions one might have. It made my father totally blind to my pain and to the ones around him.

I grew up feeling guilty and dirty. Sometimes I would say shocking things to other girls, just to see how they reacted. I felt that I was dirty and they were innocent. Sometimes I would draw naked women and then smudge everything out so that nobody would know.

As an adolescent, I dreaded the way my body was changing, the way it was growing to resemble the bodies of the women my father loved and failed to hide from me. I couldn’t see how he didn’t ever think that these girls were like me: somebody’s daughters. Did he want me, his daughter, to behave like that? Did he have no empathy for women at all?

As I grew up, I began to fight and yell at him that only perverts do what he does. Then my grandmother would tell me, “That’s what real men do! He is not a homosexual that’s why!” There was nowhere to go. I didn’t want to tell my mother anything because I didn’t want to upset her. In my head I felt like I was protecting her, I felt I had to be strong enough for everybody.

When I visited my father, I would dress as childish and covered as I could. I just didn’t feel safe with him. It hurt more than I can express with words, the thought that this was the man that was supposed to protect me from perverts, from predators, and from the world; yet instead I felt I needed to hide myself and protect myself from him. We used to walk on the beach and he would take his camera out and take pictures of sunbathing women before they could notice him. No amount of porn or real women was ever enough for him. Thus I grew up feeling that a “real man” was somebody unable to control any urge.

I also grew up feeling that any woman was more important to my father than me; all she had to do was show her body and I would just disappear from his conscience. He would instantly go from being present and caring to treating me like a nuisance to be disposed of. Growing up I never had any notion of romance, marriage, or the possibility of happy monogamy. I thought all these things were a huge lie and thought I knew the truth: sex was everything and love was just a nonexistent idea between a man and a woman.

I had my first boyfriend at age 17 and we went much further than I wanted. I hated it and felt dirty for days. Why did I do it? Because we were in the same social group and I was afraid that he would embarrass me by telling everybody that I was a virgin, like being a virgin was such a bad and shameful thing. That’s how skewed my version of sex and intimacy was. And who could I tell? Everybody thought that porn was sexy, that it was cool, or a good subject for joking. I saw that other men admired my father for being so “sexual” and for being able to get so many women. The society that we lived in told him that he was “a real man”, and told me that I must be too sensitive.

Then, lucky for me, I started associating with women who fought; who courageously expressed what they really thought and felt, no matter how unpopular it made them. I confronted my father and said all I wanted was to hear an acknowledgement, a simple apology for what he had put me through. He denied everything.

The last time I was in his house I discovered porn and I erased everything. All he had to say about it was that he was angry because “I trespassed his private files.” He finished by telling me, “Why is it your concern what I like or not?”

He is a lonely man now. He calls me often to try and get me to talk to him. I miss having a father. We traveled together so many times growing up and I played with him often as a child. But I cannot forget. Everybody has to live with their own choices. And he does. I now haven’t seen him for over a year.

So few people know about my struggles. If I had grown up with an alcoholic father, oh how easy it would have been to speak about it. Everybody knows what that is and everybody can be sympathetic. But this? You have to hide and feel shameful. You feel that people don’t understand. How can you explain it?

——————————————————-

Isn’t this a heartbreaking story? 

Unfortunately, this is what porn does. It can create an obsession with something that is not real and lead people to isolate themselves or loved ones. 

Share this story to show support for the brave Fighter that shared her story with us to help raise awareness on the harmful effects of pornography.

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